Biography

Matthew Bollom is currently an Applications Engineer in the Engineering Leadership Program at National Instruments. He graduated from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in May 2013 with a degree in biomedical engineering and certificates in Computer Science and Technical Communication. He focused on bioinstrumentation where he worked on developing real-time digital signal processing algorithms and embedded control of medical devices.

Matthew Bollom

Matthew Bollom

At National Instruments, Matthew provides technical support to National Instruments' customers via phone, email, and discussion forums. By doing this, Matthew gets the opportunity to learn National Instruments' products and what their customers are doing with those products to solve problems ranging from educational learning to the Engineering Grand Challenges of the 21st Century. During this time, Matthew is further refining his career path in the company after he completes the Engineering Leadership Program.

Matthew had the opportunity to work for National Instruments as an intern in the summer of 2012. While there, he provided telephone technical support to customers and developed a demo to showcase National Instruments products and software for NIWeek, National Instruments' annual tradeshow.

At the University of Wisconsin, Matthew was actively involved with his department and student organizations. He helped develop a new sophomore-level design course that introduced students to essential technical and design skills through laboratories and a guided design project. Matthew developed three labs to teach instrumentation concepts while training and overseeing a team of student assistants to help teach these skills to the sophomore students. He also designed a web-based system to assist students and faculty to manage their design projects. Matthew was also involved with the Biomedical Engineering Society, an academic student organization devoted to advancing the field of biomedical engineering. He served as vice president of the organization for two years.

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